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great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> what have we learned from 50 years of franco-german friendship? our greatest problems can be solved when w
economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we wanted to remain that way. the political debated home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an e
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
a greater growth in the u.s. economy i think is still a question mark. >> down europe, up 10% china. okay. china, can be a source of top line growth. latin america could be a source of top line growth. >> and when asked about china, the words for sure, the idea that china is staging a rebound. >> and this is despite the fact that they have terrible fraud there. kind of overlooked it. when you're in that virtuous circle, it doesn't seem to matter what you say that's negative. people want to grasp the positive. it's a different kind of market from what we've had for multiple years. >> and to melissa's point about correlation, it's not that risk on, risk off, which we have dealt with for so long now. every hedge fund would come in, and say, europe's bad today, risk off. >> there are no more excuses for the fund managers who are underperforming the s&p 500. this year could be a good year, a different kind of year from the hedge funds that have done so poorly. >> they're going to have to do actual work. >> right. they will have to show performance now. >> they'll have to go through these quart
water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> we're back. political director and chief white house correspondent chuck todd will take us inside the numbers of the latest poll as you tee up the second term, chuck. >> four years ago, enormous expectations for president obama. there were a lot of people, hope and change was big. this time, call it pragmatic hope as far as the public is concerned. as you see here, just less than 30% believe they're going to evaluate president obama with a clean fresh slate. 64% will evaluate him based on past feelings. and here, a continuation of a trend we saw throughout the first term. very similar to what ronald reagan dealt with dur
. a lot of them have to do with the economy. fix the economy. create jobs. then there's stop spending. and then of course probably the most important that he will talk about tomorrow, compromise, work together. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. >>> let me bring in the rest of our roundtable here. joe scarborough is here from msnbc's "morning joe." adviser to obama 2012, david axelrod. chief foreign correspondent richard engel is here, safe and sound in studio. richard, it's great to see you in person this morning. "new york times" best-selling author of "team of rivals" doris kearns goodwin. in between awards shows she's joined us. and nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw. welcome to all of you. tom, that's where we tee it up. the president, as he begins a second term, very difficult climate in washington and very real expectations. >> yes. and i was looking at those top three priorities for the american people. and they all fit into his single most difficult task, it seems to me, both conceptually and specifically. in the next couple of years, he only has a couple of years, th
for the first time in three years as european credit woes continue to weigh on the global economy. officials announce on tuesday that nearly 200 million people worldwide were jobless in 2012. that's an increase of more than 4 million from the previous year. officials say unemployment grew not only in western countries but also in east asia and the middle east. nay say european debt problems affected emerging economies by hurting trade. youth unemployment is also on the rise. people aged 15 to 24 are counted for over a third of the tot number. officials are urging governments to boost job training programs for young people. looking ahead officials say global unemployment will continue to rise this year to over 220 million. they site the sluggish global economic recovery as a reason. south korean journalts have voted toyota motors camry car of the year. representatives from the japanese automaker collected the trophy for the u.s. built sedan at a ceremony in seoul. the journalists praised the cars price competitiveness. it beat 44 models introduced last year including vehicles by bmw. toyota e
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
the economy? we have a former white house political director under president george w. bush and a former chief of staff to west virginia senator joe mansion. >> great to be here. >> eric: matt, let me start with you. how do we get here? >> well, you know, i think about the president i served, george w. bush. when he came to office, he really was concerned about trying to if i understand a way to reach across the aisle because clearly bill clinton left the presidency with high numbers. he worked with ted kennedy. he worked with democrats and signature domestic policy issues and then 9/11 happened and the wars occurred. really, the nation polarized again, right versus left. i don't think we have come out of that. obama inherited that. but he talked about bridging that and governing in a way to bring right and left together. i happening the number-1 failure of president obama is not the economy. it's his failure to find a way to bring us all together. >> eric: chris, what about that? >> well, i think it's easy to put it on president obammasm the fact is, this has been building and arguably buildi
they were so-called developed economies. and so what i thought i would do here is just run through some of the lessons that we learned there that i think, unfortunately, shut up and looked at by the europeans. and they are only now starting to realize that they could have cut down the present negative situation because let's face it, europe as a whole, with a few exceptions, is in either a recession or stagnation. first, each country is unique. this is something they didn't want to see. greece adding the situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side and raid the banks. in the case of ireland, it was the banks the drag the sovereign is -- sovereign as. in the case of portugal, with some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under. and a government that basically drove up the deficit, and regional governments because regions are very important in spain, also drove up thi
to not be part of that, because it is terrible for the economy and seems to be bad politics. host: white house press secretary jay carney. let's hear purcellville in broken arrow, oklahoma, republican. what is your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? caller: i love c-span and i am so glad that you have this live call-in talk show from individuals all over the world. my question is, to the republicans, i know that you heard in the inaugural speech to the word "to gather." we have to come together. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republican
not to be a political football that by becoming that, does damage to our economy. >> without any question, obama's real objective is not just obamacare, but it's to eliminate any political opposition, to just wipe them off the map and the media is now telling them not only will they help, but offering advice how to do it. >> who does that look like to you? >> for the past couple of weeks, this is how we've heard about jodi arias. >> do you know who that is? >> it looks like jodi. >> prosecutors working as hard as they can to send her to death row, but tonight, we hear about jodi in a different way. it happens here, her home for now, the maximum security tower in the jail in phoenix. i was given exclusive access to this units and i met jodi. >> how are you feeling. >> this is jodi's room here, a cell. it's a small room, windows at the top and three burnings and only jodi's's in the middle and her roommate's down here. >> to the a tax threat, and nicolas sarkozy and his wife are thinking escaping france to avoid a huge tax. >> and sarkozy and his wife carla bruney except the tax rate of 75% proposed by h
second term from the domestic economy and diplomacy to climate change. he talked about values and principles common to all americans. he said prosperity must rest on the shoulders of the rising middle class. >> no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people. >> obama begins his second term with several battles looming. he'll try to work with republicans in the house of representatives to revamp gun control laws and avoid defaulting on the national debt. ♪ the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air >> pop star beyonce sang the national anthem. her performance capped off the official proceedings ahead of the inaugural parade. then the president walked the capitol route from the building to the white house. the inauguration four years ago drew almost 2 million people. this time an estimated 475,000 turned out. >>> prime mi
of strengthening the middle class, and creating a equitable domestic economy. and that message is now forming foreign policy as well. senator john kerry laid out his vision at the senate confirmation hearings yesterdays, and it relies as much on economics as diplomasy. >> we know that american foreign policy is not defined by drones and deployments alone. more than ever foreign policy is economic policy. the world is competing for resources in global markets. >> jennifer: the obama/kerry foreign policy doctrine might be it's the economy stupid, and in fact it is really a economic strategy. much of the violence was driven by individuals financial insecurity as a result of the poverty. look at the arab spring which economic grievances lead to political revolution. a fruit selling started that protest by lighting himself on fire. his protest lead to the oh eventually overthrow of a decade's long dictatorship, and since then life has improved for tunisian. here is one union worker describing the change. >> the main benefit of the revolution is the disappearance of the stat
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
turn to handouts to survive the growing economy. -- the grim economy. the russian parliament about a draft law banning homosexual propaganda. there was only one deputy that voted against it in the lower house. outside, passion spilled over to scuffles on the street. police made arrests after the gay-rights supporters were insulted by opponents. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. >> ahead of the debate inside the russian parliament, there was drama outside on the street. gay-rights activists. police detained 20 people. later, military police turned their attention to the controversial bill. pass the first hearing by a huge margin. it will prohibit the spread of homosexual propaganda in the wording which presence of children. it would mean across russia public events promoting gay rights could be broken up and the organizers find -- fined. >> we see open propaganda that harms. young people will decide on their own how to live in the future and what orientation to choose. >> this draft bill sends a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the
state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a half in/half out role for the u.k. that is very concerning to the u.s. because he has raised the stakes by saying he would put it to the british people in the referendum. if they vote to get out of the e.u. th
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
of the inaugural address. >> if the president really does care about the economy -- >> it would cancel out the whole long fight to increase auto mileage fuel efficiency standards. >> cheap energy and also a cheap dollar. >> they will fight it. stuart: there you have it. we are out of time. dagen and connell, it is yours. connell: congress set to make a move on the debt ceiling. art laffer is coming up. dagen: playing some defense. the jpmorgan ceo lashing back at critics. more regulation is needed. connell: testifying on the benghazi attack and why moore could not have been done to save americans who died in libya. we will talk about that. dagen: stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole: we are seeing the dow and the s&p hitting five-year highs. we are in quite an environment. nowhere near that 6500 mark where we were for the dow. we have seen a lot of names on the dow doing well today. microsoft, united, disney. we have had earnings season. we are all waiting on the debt ceiling and, obviously, that is something that looms over. google is up 6% now. as we await each one, it certainly can b
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. zwroo well, today is election day in jordan, and there are a couple of noteworthy things about the voting there today. yes, jordan is a kingdom, but people do get to pick some of the parliament. for the first time ever international observers were allowed to be watched over the vote looking for signs of glitches and intimidation. so far they report everything running smoothly. jordan remains pretty stable in a region turned upside down by the arab spring. this is a major point, too. jordan is friendly to israel. it's not without its problems though. that does bring us to israel. election time there as well. voters across israel choosing to keep prime minister benjamin netanyahu on the job. only his coalition kept enough seats to just stay in power. lost seats though, many of them to religious parties to the far right and to a new party with a surprising popularity. here's cnn's atika shubert. >> reporter: who is j.r.lapite. after tuesday's election, he is also the newes
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
on fox and making things understandable when it comes to the economy. thank you, we appreciate it. and this from john, i dvr your show every day, like your range of topics and style and we like the company. thank you. and grant, he's made an investment in fox business just for "varney & company." quote, i had to pay $10 per month more for my dish tv service to get fox business news. well worth it. even on a fixed income. thank you, grant. he we appreciate that. we'll read your comments throughout the show today and play you some favorite memories what we were doing the last three years, like this. my pen just disintegrated. [laughter] and don't know how that happened. and it just collapsed in my very hand here, i'm penless. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium br
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
for the global economy. this is a little under an hour. >> a pleasure to see you all here tonight. as we know, happinesses is a relative thing, and i began the day this morning in the dentist's chair having a crown put in, and here by tonight i'm at politics & prose. so i'm a very happy man having gone from one extreme to the other. so it's a special pleasure to welcome you all here tonight and, gosh, standing room only. so this is marvelous. well, i thought i would begin by telling you a few stories about what the book is about and skipping the big structure and simply tell you some stories about some of the people who are in this book, because in the end it's very much about real people. so what kind of book is this? it's big, it's heavy -- [laughter] it's, you know, you may open it with a certain trepidation. but what it is is a memoir, first of all, a little bit of a memoir of my travels in russia. it's a memoir of a firm of the people -- of a number of the people who are in the book. we've gone through 20 years together, is so it's a memoir of the last 20 years since the soviet union fel
to deport them, not to mention the effect it would have on our economy. the majority of them have been in our country for over ten years. but the point is that they would have to -- our plan, they would have a legal status here. but then they would have to go through a long process, get in line behind everyone who is a green cardholder, pay tax, go through a background check, in order to be eligible for a path to citizenship. and so i hope that some my colleagues in the house will look at the provisions that we have and, by the way, they would have to pay back taxes, and they would have to pay for their path to citizenship. i do not see a scenario where it would cost money. what costs money now is when people are in this country illegally, show up in the emergency room, with illness, and that bill is paid for by the taxpayers. >> i guess the argument, the other side makes, lamar smith, among others, you tried this in thereagan administration. they say it only encouraged more illegal immigrants to try to come to the united states. >> well, i think that's a good point. i was one of those
for the rest of the world when it comes to the economy, but they talked about how the agriculture market is very strong and also how the construction market here in the united states is going to be stronger than expected in this first half of the year. that's some good news that helped that stock out. also, travelers insurance, chris, this is a really interesting story. they came in with margins, underwriting margins that were much stronger than expected. so big losses from hurricane sandy, but they were able to raise their pricing, partially as a result of that, so that stock came in with much better earnings than expected. johnson & johnson and verizon are a little bit weaker, but five-year highs. we'll see if the market can hold on to this. chris, back to you. >> thank you, becky. >>> next, a small state's big push for gun reform. delaware attorney general beau biden will be here next to talk about the lessons that his state is learning from the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. >>> plus, biding his time? new signs the vice president is making plans to be back on inaugural podium in fo
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
read between the lines they tell you something about the overall economy. chief washington correspondent james rosen interprets for us. >> the national association of realers reports that -- realtors reports while existing home sales dipped in december, such sales are up by december 2011 by 19.8%, with total sales in 2019 reaching the highest point in five years. among the reasons why, experts cited an improving jobs market. >> the driving factor,be of course, have to include the historically low mortgage rates. for those people who can qualify. the other factor is the household formation. many of the young adults who used to live with their parents are seeking out their own housing unit. >> a recent survey by the national association of home builders and wells fargo finds home builders' confidence sagging. staying flat in january and below the 50% mark after eight consecutive growth of months. there, too, there is cause for optimism. the commerce department reported last week that housing starts surged in december. up 19.1% from the month before and setting the fastest pac
seating for up to eight. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. morning, boys. so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> and we are back in snow covered davos. more of my conversation with dig abdullah of jordan. there's another election that took place this week, this really elections, when you look at what happened, do you believe that prime minister netanyahu may be encouraged to take more positive steps to try and achieve a two-state solution? >> well, i could say, i'm probably happier with the turn out of my election than he is with his. but whatever happens there's an understanding with the prime minister because obviously -- last year, 2012 was a year where we tried to keep the atmosp
% of the entire budget of government at a time that the world is getting smaller, that our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market than anytime in our history. so not just in my briefings at the state department but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, to refugee camps and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work that our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interests. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman and mr. ranking member, not just because it will be my responsibility but because i will not be able to do this job effectively nor will our country get what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman, and members of the c
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